This week Microsoft introduced its new browser, Edge, the project that had formerly been known as Project Spartan.

Much has been made of its Hub feature, and the ability to add personal annotations to websites. However, these features are aimed at regular users, web designers will use the browser in quite a different way; whilst it’s unlikely that the majority of web designers will switch to Edge as their primary browser, the majority of us will be using it on a daily basis to test code.

Whilst we don’t know exactly how Edge will perform until we get hands-on with it, there are some things we do know, and others that we can infer.

A CHANGE OF APPROACH

When I first saw the Edge announcement, what struck me most was the change in emphasis embodied by its logo. Brands are designed to a brief handed down from board level, and so the change of identity likely mimics similar briefs being handed down to development teams.

Every week we tweet a lot of interesting stuff highlighting great content that we find on the web that can be of interest to web designers.

The best way to keep track of our tweets is simply to follow us on Twitter, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the best tweets that we sent out this past week.

Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that we tweeted about, so don’t miss out.

To keep up to date with all the cool links, simply follow us @DesignerDepot

Japan-themed paper cup sleeves by Akira Yoshimura http://depot.ly/MjvrW via @SpoonTamago

2015 has inherited a lot of trends from previous years, there’s been a steady evolution of ideas — Flat Design into Material Design for example — but nothing as revolutionary as Responsive Design.

However, we are starting to see trends that feel fresh, either through new treatments or because they’re genuinely new ways of approaching old problems. The most widespread of these so far, has been the use of patterns in web design.

Patterns serve a variety of purposes, from communicating a brand value, to adding motion to an interface, to enlivening the simple blocks of color that flat design favors. And the use of patterns, although not scientifically categorizable, falls into one of five broad and inter-related categories…

GENERATIVE PATTERNS

The combination of design and code that makes up the Web has meant that it was always going to be a fertile environment for generative art, and designers working with mathematics. From the earliest days of the Web designers were experimenting with particle systems, but in recent months we’ve seen an increasing emphasis on particles existing within a more formal pattern. These geometric patterns are a natural evolution of the form, thanks to the fact that it relies so heavily on design units and code loops.

What’s really new is that, in 2015 we’re increasingly seeing businesses adopt these kinds of pattern as an integral element of their brand.

Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, […]

Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers.

The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.
Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily for all the news.

In this month’s edition of what’s new for designers and developers, we’ve included lots of podcasts, design resource directories, lots of web apps, learning resources, productivity resources, new frameworks, APIs, team resources, and much more. And as always, we’ve also included some awesome new free fonts!
Almost everything on the list this month is free, with a few high-value paid apps and tools also included. They’re sure to be useful to designers and developers, from beginners to experts.

If we’ve missed something that you think should have been on the list, let us know in the comments. And if you know of a new app or resource that should be featured next month, tweet it to @cameron_chapman to be considered!